A Night at the Theatre

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One of my favorite places in Atlanta is the Fox Theatre. It never ceases to amaze me with its beauty and regality. Every time I walk through those doors, I am reminded of when I was a young girl seeing Annie for the first time at the Fox. My mom curled my hair and I wore a sparkly red dress just like Annie did in the movie, which I watched over and over throughout my childhood.


This week, my dad and I went to see The King and I, which was amazing. I am always blown away by live theater. It is so special to me, and I hope it is something I can cherish for years to come. As I sat up in the gallery, I imagined taking my niece to shows just like my mom took me. My college career is finally coming to an end, and I am constantly thinking of what is next, where I should go, who I should be, so it’s nice to be grounded every once in a while by the things that are happening here and now. The Fox does that for me.

Atlanta-Fox
If I have my history right, the Fox was originally built by the shriners–you know, those guys in the tall red hats with gold tassles–but because of how ornate the building plans were, they couldn’t finish, so a man named William Fox took over. He had a plan to build beautiful theaters for movies–at the time, it was silent films. But all over the country, he was building these incredible theaters or “movie palaces” as he referred to them. The Fox opened Christmas Day in 1929 to a sold out audience.

EarlyAuditorium

3720

In the 60’s, these movie palaces were going out of fashion, so a lot of them were being torn down. Luckily, the community in Atlanta was able to save the Fox and preserve it to be the place we know today. A few of the theaters that were part of the “movie palace” movement are still around today. One in Virginia still plays movies, too, for a whopping $1.99. For my friends reading this (because who else is reading this?), it is the Byrd Theater in Richmond, VA. Just take the Red Line and you’ll end up right at the doorstep.

I don’t know if I will ever get over my love of the Fox, because it is so trans-generational. When I go to the Fox, I am 7 years old again. It’s timeless.

Anyway, I hope you enjoyed this little trip down memory lane. It’s kind of just my thoughts–something I would probably journal, but after leaving the Fox on Wednesday, I wanted to shout my love for it from the rooftops, so here I am on my metaphorical rooftop, proclaiming my deep love of this old, beautiful, historical place.

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